Eagle Scout – Guidelines & Resources

Here is your one stop shopping for Eagle Scout rank resources and guidelines.   Good luck on YOUR journey to Eagle!

How to Get Started – The Steps to Eagle Scout Rank

Welcome to the road to Eagle and congratulations on your Life rank.  You next step is to get started with your Eagle Scout rank.

To get started, click here to learn more about all of the steps to earn your Eagle.  These procedures come from the 2013 Guide to Advancement Handbook, which is an incredible source of information for all of advancement.

Do you Have a Eagle Scout Service Project Coach?

eagle_project_logoCheck with your unit to see who is a Eagle Scout Service Project Coach.  If they do not have one, talk with your unit leaders and encourage them to establish one and get them trained through council resources or by attending your district’s monthly Eagle Boards.

Many units, districts, and councils use Eagle Scout service project “coaches.” They may or may not be part of proposal approval. Though it is a Scout’s option, coaches are highly recommended—especially those from the council or district level who are knowledgeable and experienced with project approvals. Their greatest value comes in the advice they provide after approval of a proposal as a candidate completes his planning. A coach can help him see that, if a plan is not sufficiently developed, then projects can fail. Assistance can come through evaluating a plan and discussing its strengths, weaknesses, and risks, but coaches shall not have the authority to dictate changes, withdraw approval, or take any other such directive action. Instead, coaches must use the BSA method of positive adult association, logic, and common sense to help the candidate make the right decisions.

In many cases, candidates will not have undertaken something like an Eagle service project. Thus, we want them to obtain guidance from others, share ideas, seek plan reviews, and go through other processes professional project planners might use. But like a professional, the Scout makes the decisions. He must not simply follow others’ directions to the point where his own input becomes insignificant. On the other hand, adult leaders must bear in mind he is yet a youth. Expectations must be reasonable and fitting.

Hmm … Need A Idea for a Project?  Check this out!

Need an idea for an Eagle Scout project project?

My Project Finder offers a decision-tree approach for giving you a few project ideas on which you can develop your own project. It is not intended to take the work out of identifying a project that ; instead, these are only ideas of what could be done.

Consider these ideas only as a starting point for your unique project.

Ready to get started?   Click here.

Eagle Scout-Related FormsRankAdvancementResources

Eagle Scout Rank Application – 2014 Revsion Fillable    NEW!   This new application form must be used as of January 1, 2014.  The cooking merit badge is now Eagle-required.

Eagle Scout Service Project Workbook – 2014 Revision Fillable    NEW!   (as of May 20, 2014)  This is the newly revised Eagle Scout Service Project Workbook. Scouts who have already downloaded the previous workbook may continue to use it. 

The Eagle Scout rank may be achieved by a Boy Scout, Varsity Scout, or qualified* Venturer or Sea Scout who has a physical or mental disability by qualifying for alternative merit badges. This does not apply to individual requirements for merit badges.The physical or mental disability must be of a permanent rather than of a temporary nature (or a disability expected to last more than two years or beyond the 18th birthday).   This request must include a written statement from a qualified health-care professional related to the nature of the disability. This person may be a physician, neurologist, psychiatrist, psychologist, etc., or an educational administrator as appropriate.

The Boy Scouts of America has created the Spirit of the Eagle Award as an honorary, posthumous special recognition for a registered youth member who has lost his or her life in an accident or through illness.

This award is bestowed by the National Court of Honor as part of the celebration of life of this young person. It recognizes the joy, happiness, and life-fulfilling experiences the Scouting program made in this person’s life.

The intention is also to help heal and comfort the youth member’s family, loved ones, and friends with their loss.  Because the Scouting program was so appreciated, loved, and enjoyed by the youth, this award will serve as a reflection of the family’s and friends’ wishes as a final salute and tribute to their departed loved one.

Eagle Scout Application Checklist

Click here for an NEGA Council Eagle Scout Application checklist.  (12/4/2007 version)

Fundraising & Donations

Before you go out and start fundraising, you need to read the official policy on fundraising and solicitation of  materials and donations.

Click here to learn more!

Service Project Planning Guidelines

Information for You

National has put together a great document which serves as a guideline for all service projects.  Click here to get a copy.

Information for Project Beneficiaries

Click here for an excellent resource document to give to your project beneficiary so they know what to expect and what the rules are for projects.

The guidelines must not be construed to be additional requirements for an Eagle Scout service project, but they do represent elements that should appear on the Eagle Scout candidate’s final project plan from the Eagle Scout Service Project Workbook, No. 512-927. The next revision of the workbook will incorporate these guidelines.

You may also want to check out the “Sweet Sixteen” of BSA safety procedures, which covers the safety procedures for physical activity.

References – Eagle Scout Rank Requirement #2

The Eagle Scout Rank Application lists six requirements. Requirement number two provides for six references (five if the Scout is not employed) to be listed who are willing to furnish a recommendation of the Scout’s behalf concerning his demonstration of the Scout Oath and Law.

In order to fulfill this requirement in the Northeast Georgia Council:

It will be the Scout’s responsibility to contact these six individuals and furnish the attached letter explaining their role in his advancement.

The letters of reference should be sent to the Chairman of the Eagle Board, in care of the Scout’s unit leader(Troop Scoutmaster, Crew Advisor, or Team Coach).

These unopened envelopes should be submitted with the Eagle Scout Application at the time it is submitted to the Scout Service Center.

All letters of reference will be treated with strict confidence as appropriate and destroyed after the National Eagle Scout Service awards the Eagle rank to the Scout.

Sample Eagle Reference Letter Solicitation Letters

These letters are good to send to the person who you would like to provide a reference letter for you.   They explain the purpose of the reference letter and how it will be used by the Eagle board.

Click here for non-religious reference version of letter

Click here for religious reference version of letter

 

Age Guidelines for Tool Use and Work at Elevations or Excavations

Training and Supervision

The use of tools, by any youth or adult, requires training in the proper use of those tools before a project starts and continuous, qualified adult supervision and discipline during the project. If in doubt, adults should be recruited for all tool use or job functions that might be dangerous.

 Click here for more information (2013 Version) … this document includes ‘Tool Usage Allowed by Age” chart.

Three Month Period After 18th Birthday Clarification Statement

There appears to be some conflicting ideas on the purpose of the three month period after a scouts eighteenth birthday and his appearing before the Eagle Board of review.

The requirements state that “all requirements” must be completed by a Scout’s eighteenth birthday. The final write up of his leadership service project is a requirement and must be completed by his eighteenth birthday as well as all other requirements. His Eagle application with reference letters and his final project write up should be submitted to one of the council service centers promptly after all requirements are complete.

The three month period after a Scout’s eighteenth birthday is not “extra time” for the scout to complete the project write up and application. This period is to allow the council to check and process his application and to forward it to his district advancement committee so a review may be scheduled. The processing of the application could take a week or more depending on holidays, workload or illness at the service center and assuming no problems that need addressed are found on  the application. Forwarding the application and write up to the district adds another week to the process. If the district has just held its boards of review it may be four weeks until they have another one scheduled. So as you can see the importance of the scout getting everything turned in as soon as possible is imperative.

If the three month period is exceeded the scout must petition the council advancement committee for a time extension  to sit a board between the three and six month period following his birthday. A time extension to sit a board in this time period is not automatic. A letter from an adult explaining what extenuating circumstances prevented the board of review from being held within the three month window must be submitted with the request.

The “ninety day” reference that everyone refers to is actually a three month period not ninety calendar days. If a scout  turned eighteen on February 5th he would have until May 5th to appear before a review board even though February may only have twenty nine days.